Endangered Indigenous Languages Find a Home on the World’s Most Translated Website

The most translated website in the world — jw.org, the official website of Jehovah’s Witnesses — includes content in more than 1,030 languages, including many Indigenous languages considered at risk of dying out.

Among them are Central Alaskan Yupik, spoken by some 10,000 in Alaska, as well as Blackfoot, Cherokee, Choctaw, Hopi and Navajo.

For Mary Beebe, who grew up speaking Yupik in her hometown of Bethel, Alaska, the Yupik publications on jw.org have helped her embrace her culture while deepening her faith.

“God is showing his love for our people, with our language being translated for them to understand,” said Beebe, a volunteer assisting with the Yupik translation work.

The official website of Jehovah’s Witnesses – the most translated website in the world – includes content in more than 1,030 languages, including many Indigenous languages considered at risk of dying out.

“Translating Indigenous languages is a labor of love for all those involved and for our organization,” said Robert Hendriks, the U.S. spokesman of Jehovah’s Witnesses. “The work is challenging and time-consuming. But our goal isn’t to make a profit; it’s to provide the Bible’s comforting message clearly and accurately to as many people as possible.”

Sharing the Bible’s message of hope and comfort in the local Yupik community has been a powerful experience for Beebe.

“In this world where it’s so divided with people because of their race,” Beebe said, “it just makes you think how God views everyone, not this one race or that, but every one the same.”

Jw.org, the official website of Jehovah’s Witnesses, publishes encouraging content in more than 1,030 languages, including many Indigenous languages.